SciSpotlight: NYSCI News Digest

Feb 20

[video]

[video]

Feb 19

[video]

Interested in cosmetics? Today at NYSCI as part of Engineering Week, learn about cosmetic engineering, a branch of chemical engineering, from students and the founder of the Cosmetic Engineering program at Manhattan College.

Interested in cosmetics? Today at NYSCI as part of Engineering Week, learn about cosmetic engineering, a branch of chemical engineering, from students and the founder of the Cosmetic Engineering program at Manhattan College.

(via arc-en-ciels)

Feb 18

library-nysci:

Monday January 20, 2014, Martin Luther King’s Birthday.  FIRST VIRTUAL AUTHOR VISIT. Jean Marzollo read from her book, The Little Plant Doctor: The Story of George Washington Carver.  
It worked. The children were engaged during the reading. When Jean mentioned that she was happy to read about George Washington Carver on Martin Luther King Day, there was a current that ran through the children - a silent gasp. They got the connection and nodded and smiled and understood. 
In preparing for this event, I strived to keep my cynicism in check.  What about a live author signing her books for the audience? What about being THERE to encourage question?  
The audience participation and question asking period was dismal.  I interjected some of my tried and true, like “What was your favorite book when you were a child?”  (Mary Poppins).  It took a while for anyone to come up with a question.  This might have been due to the make-up of the group, being mostly children of immigrants and not raised to feel entitled.
Well, it worked for what it was… an alternative manner of presenting an author.  But why were we not packed in the library?  We had a nice bunch of listeners, but the dowel activity downstairs had people waiting in line.  Why weren’t they clamoring to get in here?  This mystifies me!
Yes, we will attempt more of these events in the future.  The challenge is choosing the right date.  Any Saturday might work, but not if the Museum is sparsely attended.  The only date that we ever really have a crowd in the library is on President’s Day in February.  We already have a live author booked for that day: Elliott Kaufman reading from his book, NUMBERS EVERYWHERE.

library-nysci:

Monday January 20, 2014, Martin Luther King’s Birthday.  FIRST VIRTUAL AUTHOR VISIT. Jean Marzollo read from her book, The Little Plant Doctor: The Story of George Washington Carver. 

It worked. The children were engaged during the reading. When Jean mentioned that she was happy to read about George Washington Carver on Martin Luther King Day, there was a current that ran through the children - a silent gasp. They got the connection and nodded and smiled and understood.

In preparing for this event, I strived to keep my cynicism in check.  What about a live author signing her books for the audience? What about being THERE to encourage question? 

The audience participation and question asking period was dismal.  I interjected some of my tried and true, like “What was your favorite book when you were a child?”  (Mary Poppins).  It took a while for anyone to come up with a question.  This might have been due to the make-up of the group, being mostly children of immigrants and not raised to feel entitled.

Well, it worked for what it was… an alternative manner of presenting an author.  But why were we not packed in the library?  We had a nice bunch of listeners, but the dowel activity downstairs had people waiting in line.  Why weren’t they clamoring to get in here?  This mystifies me!

Yes, we will attempt more of these events in the future.  The challenge is choosing the right date.  Any Saturday might work, but not if the Museum is sparsely attended.  The only date that we ever really have a crowd in the library is on President’s Day in February.  We already have a live author booked for that day: Elliott Kaufman reading from his book, NUMBERS EVERYWHERE.

Feb 14

Sound of deep space revealed for first time in stunning new recordings | Science & Tech | News | Daily Express -

Feb 06

Full STEAM Ahead

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STEM – the acronym popular with educators and policymakers – shortens the decidedly clunky phrase: science, technology, engineering and mathematics. But something seemed to be missing. So leaders from science, engineering, mathematics, education and design have been advocating incorporating art and design into STEM education. In other words, STEM should now be referred to as STEAM.

A writer from The Atlantic, who applauded the new STEAM acronym, quoted NYSCI’s President and CEO Margaret Honey as saying “It’s not about adding on arts education. It’s about fundamentally changing education to incorporate the experimentation and exploration that is at the heart of effective education.” 

[video]

Feb 03

[video]

Jan 31

Happiness is a Butterfly

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There are some things in life we’d be glad to see less of: bills, litter, standardized tests. Monarch butterflies are not one of them. The striking orange and black wings of the monarch make it one of the most favorite butterfly species in North America. Unfortunately, this year’s numbers of monarchs are the lowest ever on record. At their peak in 1996, monarchs covered nearly 45 acres of forest in their overwintering grounds in Mexico. This year, they covered only 1.65 acres.

So spare some space in your garden this year for milkweed. If you’ve seen our current 3D film Flight of the Butterflies, you know how important milkweed is to monarchs. Milkweed is where monarchs lay their eggs and is the only food source for monarch caterpillars.

Click here to learn how to plant milkweed and nectar-producing flowers to create your own butterfly garden. Then sit down quietly and wait for the butterflies to alight upon you.