makerspace-nysci:

Burrrrrrr its cold outside!  This Saturday and Sunday at the Maker Space, beat the chill with the coziest workshop in town, where we learn how to hand sew and make our very own stuffed animals or small pillows.  We will learn how to use needle and thread to sew on buttons and make stitches too create a funny faced Stuffie or a cool little pillow. 

We have two workshops each day, the first from 1:30-3:00 and the second from 3:30-5:00.  Register on the day of the event at the NYSCI admissions area.

Hope to see you there.  Stay warm!

Check back for more Maker Space events happening in March: http://nysci.org/events/2014-03/

library-nysci:

Presidents Day Author Visit!

Elliott Kaufman, photographer, in the NYSCI Library, February 17, 2014.
Our library visitors learned to look at the world in a new way; recognizing letters and numbers every where they go!

Elliott engaged our audience with numbers and letters from his books, NUMBERS EVERYWHERE and ALPHABET EVERYWHERE.
Who is seven? he asked. He handed them photos of the number 7 that he has found in architecture and other places.
Who’s name starts with a B (or C or D)? 

This was a different sort of visit than our usual straight forward author visit.  He did not read a story or talk about writing children’s books.  He engaged the audience in visual fun.  They eagerly responded.  Thank you Elliot!  And thanks to Abbeville Press for making this happen and supporting our promotions.

jtotheizzoe:

via awkwardsituationist:

daniel stoupin, a doctoral candidate in marine biology at the university of queensland, has photographed a variety of coral species using full spectrum light to reveal fluorescent pigments that would otherwise be invisible to the naked eye. each piece (click pic for name) is from the great barrier reef. given the complexity of the techniques used, which involve time-lapse and stereoscopic and focus stacked photography, the images take up to ten hours to produce in the lab.

Wow. I thought these were computer-generated protein models or something at first, but these are brilliantly fluorescing corals!!

What might be seeing these stunning fluorescent displays? Coral aren’t known to have any photo-sensitivity (at least past the larval stage), so the obvious candidates are fish, whose eyes would be sensitive to the emitted fluorescent wavelengths.

Do fish like that exist? Earlier this year, researchers at the American Museum of Natural History were photographing their own corals’ fluorescence when they accidentally noticed one of their eels was fluorescing too. No one had noticed because the fluorescence is usually masked in the presence of broad visible light as seen by us land-lubbers.

It turns out that fluorescence in fish is surprisingly common. Water filters out long and medium wavelength light (reds and yellows) as it gets deeper, which is why it’s blue. To compensate for this limited spectral availability, fish have turned to fluorescence as a way to expand the wavelengths of communication and camouflage in their normally azure-monochrome world. 

You can read more about the bright and bustling world of fluorescent fish at The New York Times.

(via jtotheizzoe)

Interested in cosmetics? Today at NYSCI as part of Engineering Week, learn about cosmetic engineering, a branch of chemical engineering, from students and the founder of the Cosmetic Engineering program at Manhattan College.

Interested in cosmetics? Today at NYSCI as part of Engineering Week, learn about cosmetic engineering, a branch of chemical engineering, from students and the founder of the Cosmetic Engineering program at Manhattan College.

(via arc-en-ciels)

library-nysci:

Monday January 20, 2014, Martin Luther King’s Birthday.  FIRST VIRTUAL AUTHOR VISIT. Jean Marzollo read from her book, The Little Plant Doctor: The Story of George Washington Carver.  
It worked. The children were engaged during the reading. When Jean mentioned that she was happy to read about George Washington Carver on Martin Luther King Day, there was a current that ran through the children - a silent gasp. They got the connection and nodded and smiled and understood. 
In preparing for this event, I strived to keep my cynicism in check.  What about a live author signing her books for the audience? What about being THERE to encourage question?  
The audience participation and question asking period was dismal.  I interjected some of my tried and true, like “What was your favorite book when you were a child?”  (Mary Poppins).  It took a while for anyone to come up with a question.  This might have been due to the make-up of the group, being mostly children of immigrants and not raised to feel entitled.
Well, it worked for what it was… an alternative manner of presenting an author.  But why were we not packed in the library?  We had a nice bunch of listeners, but the dowel activity downstairs had people waiting in line.  Why weren’t they clamoring to get in here?  This mystifies me!
Yes, we will attempt more of these events in the future.  The challenge is choosing the right date.  Any Saturday might work, but not if the Museum is sparsely attended.  The only date that we ever really have a crowd in the library is on President’s Day in February.  We already have a live author booked for that day: Elliott Kaufman reading from his book, NUMBERS EVERYWHERE.

library-nysci:

Monday January 20, 2014, Martin Luther King’s Birthday.  FIRST VIRTUAL AUTHOR VISIT. Jean Marzollo read from her book, The Little Plant Doctor: The Story of George Washington Carver. 

It worked. The children were engaged during the reading. When Jean mentioned that she was happy to read about George Washington Carver on Martin Luther King Day, there was a current that ran through the children - a silent gasp. They got the connection and nodded and smiled and understood.

In preparing for this event, I strived to keep my cynicism in check.  What about a live author signing her books for the audience? What about being THERE to encourage question? 

The audience participation and question asking period was dismal.  I interjected some of my tried and true, like “What was your favorite book when you were a child?”  (Mary Poppins).  It took a while for anyone to come up with a question.  This might have been due to the make-up of the group, being mostly children of immigrants and not raised to feel entitled.

Well, it worked for what it was… an alternative manner of presenting an author.  But why were we not packed in the library?  We had a nice bunch of listeners, but the dowel activity downstairs had people waiting in line.  Why weren’t they clamoring to get in here?  This mystifies me!

Yes, we will attempt more of these events in the future.  The challenge is choosing the right date.  Any Saturday might work, but not if the Museum is sparsely attended.  The only date that we ever really have a crowd in the library is on President’s Day in February.  We already have a live author booked for that day: Elliott Kaufman reading from his book, NUMBERS EVERYWHERE.

Full STEAM Ahead

image

STEM – the acronym popular with educators and policymakers – shortens the decidedly clunky phrase: science, technology, engineering and mathematics. But something seemed to be missing. So leaders from science, engineering, mathematics, education and design have been advocating incorporating art and design into STEM education. In other words, STEM should now be referred to as STEAM.

A writer from The Atlantic, who applauded the new STEAM acronym, quoted NYSCI’s President and CEO Margaret Honey as saying “It’s not about adding on arts education. It’s about fundamentally changing education to incorporate the experimentation and exploration that is at the heart of effective education.” 

(Source: garlogan78, via wilwheaton)

Victor Cruz, Anne Burrell join NYSCI and Time Warner Cable to kick off a new national initiative

On Saturday, we joined Time Warner Cable for Connect a Million Minds Day at Highline Stages.  TWC and Boys & Girls Clubs were kicking off a new national partnership and our Explainers were there… and they brought the STEM…

Brought to life by the New York Hall of Science in conjunction with numerous network partners, Connect a Million Minds Day attendees participated in fun, hands-on learning activities that demonstrated the STEM behind popular TV shows and networks, and how these subjects power the activities young people are most passionate about, such as sports, music and cooking.

Full article here.

Happiness is a Butterfly

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There are some things in life we’d be glad to see less of: bills, litter, standardized tests. Monarch butterflies are not one of them. The striking orange and black wings of the monarch make it one of the most favorite butterfly species in North America. Unfortunately, this year’s numbers of monarchs are the lowest ever on record. At their peak in 1996, monarchs covered nearly 45 acres of forest in their overwintering grounds in Mexico. This year, they covered only 1.65 acres.

So spare some space in your garden this year for milkweed. If you’ve seen our current 3D film Flight of the Butterflies, you know how important milkweed is to monarchs. Milkweed is where monarchs lay their eggs and is the only food source for monarch caterpillars.

Click here to learn how to plant milkweed and nectar-producing flowers to create your own butterfly garden. Then sit down quietly and wait for the butterflies to alight upon you.