Biomodd’s Spongebot is a recent addition to their installation at NYSCI. Come see Biomodd as part of NYSCI’s exhibition ReGeneration, on through Jan 13.

ReGeneration is now open! Come imagine a future where our communities are vital and sustainable. Now at NYSCI, through January 13.
Click here to see the photoset from the exhibit opening.

ReGeneration is now open! Come imagine a future where our communities are vital and sustainable. Now at NYSCI, through January 13.

Click here to see the photoset from the exhibit opening.

Kenya, Meet New York

Photo by Liz TitoneNew Yorkers are accustomed to tourists. Approximately 50 million of them visit our city each year to soak up the culture, take in a Broadway show, and gobble down untold numbers of pizza slices. But this summer, the city will welcome a very special group of youngsters from Kenya. The school kids will visit NYSCI, participate in science lessons, and get a glimpse of life in New York City – all without ever leaving Africa.

The students will visit as part of a distance-learning program that will use videoconferencing technologies to virtually connect the Sereolipi Primary School in Kenya with our instructors at NYSCI. This pilot program, called The Mizizi Project, is a part of a partnership with the nonprofit organization e2 education & environment, which seeks to unite students and teachers in different parts of the world through a single collaborative virtual learning experience.

Over a series of sessions this summer, the students in Kenya will work on topics such as microbiology, biomimicry and environmental science. The result will be a “global classroom” where New Yorkers and Kenyans work together on a shared science curriculum.

Now if only we could get the other 50 million tourists to stop buying up all the Book of Mormon tickets …

Photo by Liz Titone

poptech:

areimage:

Great Garbage Patch

Photographer Chris Jordan specializes in large-scale works that depict the magnitude of our consumerism and its impact on our environment. In one of the most emotional presentations at PopTech 2009, Jordan shares heart-wrenching images of birds killed by ingesting plastics that increasingly pollute our oceans.

poptech:

areimage:

Great Garbage Patch

Photographer Chris Jordan specializes in large-scale works that depict the magnitude of our consumerism and its impact on our environment. In one of the most emotional presentations at PopTech 2009, Jordan shares heart-wrenching images of birds killed by ingesting plastics that increasingly pollute our oceans.

(Source: Flickr / metrobest)

It is official! Modular//Neuroid and The New York Hall of Science will be collaborating to create a multi-layered experience for middle and high school students in a project titled Collect, Construct, Change().  The project will give students the chance to collect data on environmental pollution in the field, and then offer them a platform in which to experience this data.  This experience will come in the form of an augmented reality cell phone application. The project will culminate in the form of several workshops over the summer at NySci, and a presentation and workshop at the first ever Maker Faire NYC (which is being held at the New York Hall of Science, September 25 and 26, 2010)! The final step of the project is to promote environmental advocacy through the children participating.  This is extremely exciting.  It also means that I am employed through October 2010. Thank goodness.

This has been on the books for some time now, and have waited to announce it on this site as there were several details to work out. Everything is a go, and I have already begun prototyping for this iteration of modular//neuroid.  I am extremely lucky to have this opportunity and intend on making use of it.  My involvement is the result of a collaboration between the New Youth City Learning Network, along with Parsons and NySci.  The team also consists of a Columbia post-doc, as well as the Bank Street College andCity Lore.

More on this soon!

climateadaptation:

plantedcity:

From The Guardian:

A quintessentially Canadian winter tradition – outdoor ice hockey – could be facing extinction within decades because of climate change, a new  study says.

Pick-up games of ice hockey, also called shinny or pond hockey, are a way of life during the long winters. Many towns are studded with neighbourhood ice rinks, some families even freeze over their backyards. Ottawa has the Rideau Canal, the 5-mile skate run through the nation’s capital. But such pursuits are in peril as milder winters and earlier springs pare down the outdoor ice season.

The ice season has shortened noticeably over the last 50 years, especially in southern British Columbia and Alberta and parts of the prairie provinces, the study in the Institute of Physics’ journal, Environmental Research Letters, says. 

It takes a long cold spell to be able to build a good foundation for ice sports – at least three days in a row at -5C, the researchers determined, from interviews with public rink officials.

But temperature records from 142 weather stations across the southern belt of Canada, where most of the population lives, showed a distinct warming trend from 1951-2005.

According to the criteria set by rink officials, many of those locations would have experienced later start dates for outdoor skating over the years. Most showed shorter seasons, as much as 20 to 30% shorter in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba and parts of western Ontario. Only Atlantic Canada showed a longer season.

Check out the rest of the article here.

(Photo credit: The Guardian)

my-carbon-footprint:

By Guest Blogger: Stacey Bowden

Now, more than ever before, teachers are faced with difficult decisions regarding their curriculum. With the onset of new standards and new testing, we are now asking ourselves what is important for us to teach? What is it that we currently do that continues…

After coming under fire for a lack of information about water quality in city rivers, the Department of Environmental Protection is designing an alert system which would issue warnings whenever it dipped.

Read more: http://www.dnainfo.com/20110810/harlem/dep-agrees-notify-public-when-sewage-enters-water#ixzz1VPRVhH6E

"I have long admired NYSCI’s imaginative approach to science teaching, so I am delighted to be working with them on this project," said Kevin Parker, Global Head of Deutsche Bank’s Asset Management division and a member of Deutsche Bank’s Group Executive Committee. “I have complete confidence that they will develop a curriculum that will effectively engage and educate New York children about climate change. Action to fight global warming begins with public awareness, and awareness starts with education. Teaching the next generation about this issue is ultimately, therefore, the surest way of conquering such a vast and complex problem. We cannot start too soon.”