Victor Cruz, Anne Burrell join NYSCI and Time Warner Cable to kick off a new national initiative

On Saturday, we joined Time Warner Cable for Connect a Million Minds Day at Highline Stages.  TWC and Boys & Girls Clubs were kicking off a new national partnership and our Explainers were there… and they brought the STEM…

Brought to life by the New York Hall of Science in conjunction with numerous network partners, Connect a Million Minds Day attendees participated in fun, hands-on learning activities that demonstrated the STEM behind popular TV shows and networks, and how these subjects power the activities young people are most passionate about, such as sports, music and cooking.

Full article here.

Former NYSCI instructor Adiel Fernadez discusses his projects that can transform museums into real learning experiences.

"Science is the foundation of everything in the world."

"It is a word that is connected to broad cultural dichotomies: observation and intuition, evidence and tradition. A wide variety of discussions centered on science this year, from climate change to educational policy. We saw heated debates about ‘phony’ science, or whether science held all the answers." The result was a 176 percent increase in lookups of the word "science" in 2013 compared with 2012.

plantculture:

Commissioned by the New York Hall of Science for ReGeneration, artist Amy Franceschini has created a mobile fieldwork station that aims to challenge the dominance of ”modern quantitative science as compared to the long tradition of qualitative indigenous knowledge through an inventory of…

“The scientist does not study nature because it is useful; he studies it because he delights in it, and he delights in it because it is beautiful. If nature were not beautiful, it would not be worth knowing, and if nature were not worth knowing, life would not be worth living.” 
― Henri Poincaré

“The scientist does not study nature because it is useful; he studies it because he delights in it, and he delights in it because it is beautiful. If nature were not beautiful, it would not be worth knowing, and if nature were not worth knowing, life would not be worth living.”
― Henri Poincaré

Sparking Curiosity

image

Glass vials, a row of chemicals, and an alcohol lamp. Perhaps nothing symbolized the excitement of science in the early to mid-20th century better than a chemistry set. The classic kits got kids tinkering, experimenting and thinking about science. In the process, they inspired a generation of inventors and scientists, some of whom became Nobel Prize-winners. But somewhere along the way, spurred by safety concerns and legal changes, chemistry sets faded in popularity.

A new competition, launched this week, aims to find the 21st century version of the classic chemistry set. A collaboration between the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Society for Science & the Public, the Science, Play and Research Kit competition (SPARK) challenges participants to generate a new set of experiences and activities that encourage imagination and interest in science, bringing the spirit of the classic chemistry set to today’s children.

Margaret Honey, NYSCI’s president and CEO, is an advisor to the competition, which will offer tangible ways to get more kids experimenting with science.

The competition’s top award is for the best science kit prototype with a prize of $50,000. Additional prizes ranging from $1,000 – $25,000 will be awarded for runners-up and idea submissions.

library-nysci:

AUTHOR VISIT IN THE LIBRARY.

Author Christy Hale read DREAMING UP to an enthusiastic audience on Saturday, October 12, 2013.  We all learned about styles of architecture. The concepts were made concrete with a building activity that followed.
One visiting educator commented on the diversity of the children pictured in the book. Christy told us that her publisher Lee & Low Books is known for creating books especially for children of color.