physicsphysics:

IBM Team makes world’s smallest movie with ATOMS: ‘A Boy and His Atom’
This video holds the Guinness World Records™ record for the World’s Smallest Stop-Motion Film (see how it was made). The ability to move single atoms — the smallest particles of any element in the universe — is crucial to IBM’s research in the field of atomic memory. But even nanophysicists need to have a little fun. In that spirit, IBM researchers used a scanning tunneling microscope to move thousands of carbon monoxide molecules (two atoms stacked on top of each other), all in pursuit of making a movie so small it can be seen only when you magnify it 100 million times.

Design Lab’s Shadow Puppets prototyping over School’s Out Weekend, NYSCI. Photos: Shimpei Takeda

explainers-nysci:

Did you know that High Five Day is coming up?

At Explainer TV we decided to make a special high five video. By using our Bullet Time Animation exhibit, we turned an awesome high five into an epic high five.

If you have seen movies like The Matrix or Max Payne then you have seen bullet time in action. It involves several high speed cameras, each positioned at a different angle, that take quick shots of the action.

In our case the action was the mid air high five. After the pictures are taken, a computer puts the images into sequence. This allows us to see relatively fast camera movement for a super slow motion or freeze frame action.

There you have it. Bullet Time.

(Source: youtu.be)

Puppet 3.0

The world has changed a lot since you were a wide-eyed, innocent kid playing with your handmade sock puppet. Puppets have come a long way too.

This week, NYSCI opens Puppet Parade, a new type of puppetry created by Design I/O that uses computers and Xboxes to merge the movements of real people with projections of larger-than-life creatures. Puppeteers control the animals using their hands and arms. Then their actions are tracked through Xbox Kinects, the data is sent through a computer to a projector, and presto! – a fantastical, interactive scene is displayed on a 17-by-26-foot wall.

The experience includes all the entertainment of that old sock puppet, while also including the interactivity and special effects of today’s technology.