Throughout December, NYSCI’s Maker Space will be bustling with “Cardboard Creations.” Using cardboard and tape, design, make and build your own arcade games. This program was inspired by 9-year-old Caine Monroy, who built an elaborate cardboard arcade inside his dad’s used auto parts store. Free with NYSCI admission.

(Source: explainers-nysci)

library-nysci:

Marlene Kliman of TERC shares ways to incorporate math skills in every day life.  The NYSCI Library has worked with this great organization in past projects. TERC’s mission is to improve mathematics and science education.  We can certainly appreciate that!
Check out the Mixing in Math video at momshomeroom.msn.com

library-nysci:

Marlene Kliman of TERC shares ways to incorporate math skills in every day life.  The NYSCI Library has worked with this great organization in past projects. TERC’s mission is to improve mathematics and science education.  We can certainly appreciate that!

Check out the Mixing in Math video at momshomeroom.msn.com

Need a reason to give to NYSCI this year? Here’s a 1 minute reminder.

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New York Hall of Science Teaches Genetics with Video Games

GeniGames teaches both research and applied science, says SciPlay Director David Kanter. Four versions of the game will be used in different New York City high school science classes this winter, while SciPlay researchers track which elements contribute to students’ understanding of scientific concepts. “We’re measuring learning, but we’re also measuring a lot of different affective dimensions of learning like motivation, engagement, and emotional state,” Kanter says. “As opposed to taking it for granted that games are great and that everything should be gamified, we’re trying to understand what the value is [and] for whom.”

In GeniGames’ first version, students design and breed their perfect pet lizard as they learn about concepts like meiosis and genetic inheritance. The second version adds a bit of narrative backstory to the game and replaces lizards with dragons, using the same scientific curriculum. The third adds an element of competition by asking students to design dragons for specific tasks such as racing or catching fish. And the fourth adds the element of community: SciPlay will host a competitive tournament among participating classrooms. Underlying the game are sound genetic concepts based on the known genomes of various animals, so it is realistic, Kanter says.

The study is set to end in August 2014. “We have a hypothesis that not all of these gaming elements are across-the-board great for all kids, so we will be looking into our data at the level of individual students to figure out for whom does narrative really work,” Kanter says. Data gathered in the high schools could also help SciPlay and its collaborators to eventually design games for younger children, he adds.

Christie Rizk is a reporter and editor based in New York. She was most recently an assistant editor for GenomeWeb’s Genome Technology magazine, and has worked as a reporter, editor, and producer at Reuters, Thomson Financial, and The Brooklyn Paper.

Mike Wilson’s Nano Rap at the NYSCI Village, World Maker Faire 2012.

Mike Wilson’s Nano Rap at the NYSCI Village, World Maker Faire 2012.

Making Meaning [M2] conference.
October 1, 2012.
A Maker Education Initiative organized by the New York Hall of Science.

Making Meaning [M2] conference.

October 1, 2012.

A Maker Education Initiative organized by the New York Hall of Science.

LOOK WHAT’S COMING TO WORLD MAKER FAIRE - Courtesy of NYSCI’s Playworks blog, we encountered Deren at last week’s Mini Maker Faire in Pittsburgh. She’ll be with us in NYC this weekend

playworks-nysci:

Check out Deren Guler this weekend at World Maker Faire.  I got to speak with Deren at Pittsburgh’s Mini Maker Faire (9/22) about FLOAT, a participatory art/design project that co-builds air quality sensing kites.  Deren just returned from Beijing where she partnered with master kite builders to lead three workshops for local residents to build their own air quality sensors and kites to fly together.  She is interested to see how this project can be applied in different contexts.  We are hoping Deren will make a guest appearance in an upcoming Little Makers to help us build air quality sensing kites here at NYSCI.  

Tips for Teachers

The final post in our back-to-school tips for teachers comes courtesy of Scott Wayne Indiana, a Content Developer in NYSCI’s Design Lab:

I taught high school math for ten years and the first day of every class involved very little math.  I wanted to get to know the students as individuals, as fellow humans.  I wanted to hear from each of them.  The seeds for the classroom community were planted and we grew from there. 

See the complete series of teacher tips here.

For more teacher resources all year long, visit Teachers TryScience.

Tips for Teachers

Our next back-to-school tip for teachers comes courtesy of Deliz Vasquez, a fifth grade teacher in Hunts Point:

One thing which I find very helpful is having a “Best Practice” notebook when I visit classrooms, attend meetings, conferences, or professional development.  This way I can implement some strategies in my own classroom.

See the complete series of teacher tips here.

For more teacher resources all year long, visit Teachers TryScience.

 

 

 

Teacher Tips

Week two of the school year! We kick off with another installment of back-to-school tips from teachers for teachers. Today, from Amanda Solarsh, 7th Grade science teacher at Simon Baruch Middle School:

Revamp rules, routines and procedures and rethinking classroom setup to start fresh.

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