Have you ever asked yourself these questions? Find the answer in our interactive exhibition, “The Evolution - Health Connection.” Learn how human evolution has promoted our survival but not always our good health.

#Science #Health #Evolution #Humans #nysci #nyc #queens  (at New York Hall of Science)

Have you ever asked yourself these questions? Find the answer in our interactive exhibition, “The Evolution - Health Connection.” Learn how human evolution has promoted our survival but not always our good health.

#Science #Health #Evolution #Humans #nysci #nyc #queens (at New York Hall of Science)

Voices from the Past

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As New York City gets ready to implement its ban on big sodas, the issue of obesity once again takes center stage.

We’ve heard from nutrition experts, soda corporations, consumer agencies, politicians and Joe Schmo about whether we should have a tax and if it will do any good. But why do we crave all these bad-for-you foods in the first place?

Turns out it’s partly evolution’s fault. Our prehistoric, hunter-gatherer ancestors didn’t have regular access to high-energy foods, so when it was available, they gorged on it. Think ice-cream-binge-after-being-dumped kind of gorging. Only instead of ice cream, they feasted on animals they were able to hunt, and fruit and nuts that were in season. Those high calorie binges helped fuel their big brains. But today, we have access to far more sugar and fat than our bodies need, which can lead to overindulgence and obesity.

This link between how our species evolved and the foods we crave today is explored in our new exhibition, The Evolution – Health Connection, which is open through June. Along with obesity, The Evolution – Health Connection also looks at the evolutionary reasons behind some other very human problems: painful childbirths, sunburns, lactose intolerance and back problems.

So the next time that little voice in your head says that you need a soda and fries, resist! Stand firm! Distract yourself! Because after all, it’s just your ancestors talking.

Charlie & Kiwi’s Evolutionary Adventure at a bookstore near you

Charlie & Kiwi book coverNYSCI’s famous Charlie and Kiwi touring exhibit, curated and researched by our very own Science Interpretation Consultant, Martin Weiss, is now a best selling book presented and illustrated by award winning Peter H. Reynolds, and available on Amazon and at the NYSCI store. Charlie and Kiwi’s Evolutionary Adventure opened at NYSCI in May 2009, and then began touring the United States in August 2009. Since then, it has received rave reviews, tackling the subject of evolution in a manner that appeals to kids of all ages.

Via Amazon:

Charlie and Kiwi: An Evolutionary Adventure

Is that a bird?

Where are its big, feathery wings?

Why does it have whiskers like a cat?

A kiwi can’t be a bird, can it?

The answer, Charlie learns is simply evolutionary.

Presented by Peter Reynolds and FableVision and supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation, this is an easy to understand scientific adventure. Charlie and Kiwi (with help from great, great, great, great, great Grandpa Charles Darwin) take you on a journey through time and through a huge scientific principle. The story of evolution—and that strange little Kiwi bird—reminds us that sometimes what seems like a raw deal (a bird that can’t fly) turns out to be just perfect!

The New York Hall of Science is New York’s hands-on science and technology center. They promote science and technology as important tools that help us understand ourselves and the world we live in.

Visit the exhibit behind the book, Charlie & Kiwi’s Evolutionary Adventure in person or online http://www.nysci.org/explore/ontour/charlieandkiwi.

FableVision is an award-winning children’s media developer and book packager founded by Peter and Paul Reynolds. 

Peter H. Reynolds is the bestselling author and illustrator of The Dot and Ish and illustrator for the New York Times #1 bestseller Someday by Alison McGhee. He is also the illustrator of Little BoyCharlie and Kiwi and the Judy Moody series. He lives in Dedham, Mass. where he is co-owner of the Blue Bunny bookstore. Visit Peter online at peterhreynolds.com.