We all know about the concept of counting calories - but have you ever really thought about what that means?

In this quick video by ASAP Science, the difference in quantity and quality of 200 calories worth of various foods is explored. More than anything, this visual shows how counting calories is not the end all be all to a healthy diet. Instead, a balanced diet made up of foods containing the most nutrients per calorie is the way to go.

Check out the video above!

The idea of medicine as food has existed for centuries. But throughout those centuries, the human race has been altering ancient, wild plants for our food consumption. As we have selected for sweeter and larger crops, we have dramatically reduced the cancer-fighting phytonutrients in them. For example, native Peruvian purple potatoes have 28 times more phytonutrients than the common potatoes we consume. The wild ancestors of apples have “a staggering 100 times more phytonutrients than the Golden Delicious” variety.

What does this mean for our food supply and our health? As companies such as Monsanto as well as the US Department of Agriculture develop disease-resistant and quick-growing varieties of our crops, does this mean even more nutrient loss will occur? Time can only tell. In the mean time, be sure to use food as medicine by including more herbs, greens, and colorful vegetables in a varied diet.

Every year, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) releases their list of the twelve most pesticide-ridden fruits and veggies. Pesticides have been linked to hormone disruption in children and have carcinogenic properties. Of course, the benefits of eating fruits and vegetables far outweigth the potential risks from pesticides, but these twelve residents of your produce aisle should be bought organic whenever possible.
Apples - apples test positive for pesticides 99% of the time!
Strawberries
Grapes
Celery
Peaches
Spinach
Bell Peppers
Imported nectarines - all samples tested positive for pesticides
Cucumbers
Potatoes
Cherry Tomatoes
Hot Peppers
 

Every year, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) releases their list of the twelve most pesticide-ridden fruits and veggies. Pesticides have been linked to hormone disruption in children and have carcinogenic properties. Of course, the benefits of eating fruits and vegetables far outweigth the potential risks from pesticides, but these twelve residents of your produce aisle should be bought organic whenever possible.

  1. Apples - apples test positive for pesticides 99% of the time!
  2. Strawberries
  3. Grapes
  4. Celery
  5. Peaches
  6. Spinach
  7. Bell Peppers
  8. Imported nectarines - all samples tested positive for pesticides
  9. Cucumbers
  10. Potatoes
  11. Cherry Tomatoes
  12. Hot Peppers

 

No more Rice Krispies at school? From the above video… (please excuse the opening advertisement!)

Recently, the USDA has developed new rules on what kinds of snack foods can be sold in public schools in the US, created as an extension of the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010 signed by President Obama.

According to the Wall Street Journal, the first ingredient of snacks purchased on school grounds now must be a vegetable, fruit, dairy product, whole grain, or protein. If an item doesn’t meet that standard, it could still be sold if it contains 10% of the Daily Value for calcium, potassium, vitamin D, or fiber - if it is naturally occurring, not as part of a fortification or supplementation package.

If these rules hold, school cafeterias around the country could be looking very different very soon. However, there is already backlash from food industry giants crying foul over lost profits and marketing and the standards are not yet finalized.

What do you think - is it the government’s responsibility to restrict harmful foods from reaching kids’ hands while they are in school? Should good nutrition practices start at home? Or should parents, teachers, and the government work together to start changing the food kids eat?

mothernaturenetwork:

How Farm to School programs are chipping away at childhood obesity
These healthy food initiatives emphasize local food consumption, school gardens and food education in school curriculums.

mothernaturenetwork:

How Farm to School programs are chipping away at childhood obesity

These healthy food initiatives emphasize local food consumption, school gardens and food education in school curriculums.

LIGHT/SOUND/PAPER/WATER: ReMake your idea of Holiday fun

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December 27 – 30, 2012; noon – 4 pm

Bend, twist, light, sculpt and taste a new version of the holiday season. Workshops, demos, artist installations and food science explorations will present a wide variety of ways to engage and leave your mark on the holidays at NYSCI. Each day of ReMake the Holidays will focus on a different theme. Most activities are free with NYSCI admission. Some projects require a small materials fee.

More info: http://www.nysci.org/visit/events/event/remake2012

Beyond rooftop gardens: Farmers Market 2.0 @ NYSCI

Learn about the ideas and methods for urban growing and food preparation at this conceptual winter farmers’ market, December 1, 2012; noon – 4 pm. Traditional market stalls will be filled with hands-on activities, artist projects, demonstrations, and of course, food! Free with NYSCI admission.

Staged presentations:

Demos and stalls by:

  • Butter-making with Little Makers
  • Hydroponic farming systems with Boswyck Farms
  • Solar panels with Biomodd’s Tamara Sabler and Zach Smart
  • Spice bundles, seed bombs and seed masks with NYSCI Explainers 

This community-based food event focuses on the cultural and sustainable elements of food and food production that pertain to ecology. The event complements NYSCI’s ReGeneration exhibition.