Radiation: a wondrous new tool in cell research, genetics and food preservation. A snapshot of a science museum evolving from 1967. 
Click to read more and subscribe to the entire series.
New York City is proving to more than 20,000 youngsters a week that science education can be an interesting, exciting experience that’s more fun than hooky. The students conduct experiments with simulated atomic equipment; watch as technician irradiate plants and seeds in lead-lined chambers; are shown how radiation serves as a wondrous new tool in cell research, in the study of genetics and in food preservation.
Today in the NYSCI Archive: An aerial view of Flushing Meadows from 1967.

Today in the NYSCI Archive: An aerial view of Flushing Meadows from 1967.


Today in the NYSCI Archive: There’s a leak in the existing structure but the Sanitation Dept band plays on.  Revisiting the 1966 opening ceremony of the Hall of Science of the City of New York.

Today in the NYSCI Archive: There’s a leak in the existing structure but the Sanitation Dept band plays on.  Revisiting the 1966 opening ceremony of the Hall of Science of the City of New York.

Magnetic memory, laser displays, and solar converters.  Just some of the premiere exhibits at NYSCI in 1966. More here

2014 is NYSCI’s 50th Birthday! We’ve just launched the NYSCI Archives to mark the occasion and unearth the memories. http://bit.ly/1foNWwC

Former NYSCI instructor Adiel Fernadez discusses his projects that can transform museums into real learning experiences.

Bill Bywater sculpts his take on ReMake the Holidays.

explore-blog:

Jake Barton's stirring TED talk about building collective memory and his work on the 9/11 Memorial and Museum, lending whole new meaning to the notion that "a museum is an institution dedicated to making connections."

The story that begins at 8:01 is nothing short of remarkable.

Also see Barton on the role of museums and memorials in society and the power of collaborative storytelling

(Source: explore-blog, via kenyatta)