“The scientist does not study nature because it is useful; he studies it because he delights in it, and he delights in it because it is beautiful. If nature were not beautiful, it would not be worth knowing, and if nature were not worth knowing, life would not be worth living.” 
― Henri Poincaré

“The scientist does not study nature because it is useful; he studies it because he delights in it, and he delights in it because it is beautiful. If nature were not beautiful, it would not be worth knowing, and if nature were not worth knowing, life would not be worth living.”
― Henri Poincaré

Next Generation Science

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Last week, new guidelines for K–12 science education were released. The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) were developed by 26 states, along with the National Research Council, the National Science Teachers Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Achieve. The standards emphasize critical thinking over content memorization and identify science and engineering practices that students should master to be fully prepared for college and careers.

NGSS also recommends that students learn about climate change. For the last two years, we have partnered with Deutsche Asset & Wealth Management on a program called My Carbon Footprint, an educational initiative designed to build awareness about climate change science. As a result of this project, we have developed two climate change curriculums – one for middle schools and one for high schools – that include hands-on activities that give students the foundation they need to understand climate change. Both curriculums align to the seven crosscutting scientific and engineering concepts identified in the NGSS framework: patterns; cause and effect; scale, proportion, and quantity; systems and system models; energy and matter: flows, cycles and conservation; structure and function; stability and change. The curriculums can be downloaded for free and can help guide teachers who implement climate change science lessons into their classrooms.

The NGSS guidelines are voluntary, but many educators are applauding the move away from rote memorization. Our president and CEO, Margaret Honey, said in a recent USA Today article that children should be taught

“how to learn and how to be discerning…When I was a kid, education was memorizing and learning lots of facts — that methodology of teaching absolutely no longer makes sense. That’s not the world we live in anymore.”

newshour:

Meet Mr. Methane, Mr. Carbon’s evil twin!
“The photo is me in costume as the evil Mr. Methane, a part I play each year as Mr. Carbon’s twisted twin who is 20 times worse than he is. It also relates directly back to the science unit I teach in my classroom to all 120 of our fourth graders on reducing solid waste and recycling.” — Geoff Chin, fourth-grade teacher in Kentfield, Calif. 
How are teachers teaching climate change?

newshour:

Meet Mr. Methane, Mr. Carbon’s evil twin!

“The photo is me in costume as the evil Mr. Methane, a part I play each year as Mr. Carbon’s twisted twin who is 20 times worse than he is. It also relates directly back to the science unit I teach in my classroom to all 120 of our fourth graders on reducing solid waste and recycling.” — Geoff Chin, fourth-grade teacher in Kentfield, Calif. 

How are teachers teaching climate change?

Today’s Design Lab is on Energy. Where do you notice energy is being transferred? Here’s some tips to get ideas to harness energy in the world to power your own design projects. What can you design that uses the energy in mechanisms from your everyday life?

Music By JewelBeat
http://www.jewelbeat.com

Hands-On help with Science projects

In response to a teachers plea for science resources, we’ve gathered some links and lessons from the Teachers Talkingscience site, some of which NYSCI has written and which extend the learning of Science Friday videos. Most of these have videos and associated lesson plans:
Comparative Metabolism and Energy use:
'Decaying Science' (lesson plan included) - http://www.talkingscience.org/2010/11/decaying-science/
'Yeast Alive! Watch Yeast Live and Breathe' (includes lesson plan) - http://www.talkingscience.org/2011/07/yeast-alive-watch-yeast-live-and-breathe/
'Gassy Microbes' (similar to/extension of above, includes lesson plan) - http://www.talkingscience.org/2010/01/gassy-microbes/
Energy content and behavior of matter:
'Kitchen Chemists - Edible Candle' (mini-lesson plan included) - http://www.talkingscience.org/2011/09/kitchen-chemists-edible-candle/
Other extensions: 
How the metabolic needs of individual organisms create ecosystem connections
'Termite Symbiosis' (lesson plan included) - http://www.talkingscience.org/2011/09/termite-symbiosis/
'After Oil Spill, Bacteria Feast on Natural gas' - http://www.talkingscience.org/2010/09/after-oil-spill/
Comparing ourselves to robots

@39forks creates a quick video of Design Lab’s sound experiments at NSTA, Indianapolis

designlab-nysci:

(Source: designlab-nysci)

NYSCI’s CEO Margaret Honey is guest contributor on Citizen IBM today: http://ibm.co/GLsKE3