Biomodd’s Spongebot is a recent addition to their installation at NYSCI. Come see Biomodd as part of NYSCI’s exhibition ReGeneration, on through Jan 13.

ReGeneration: Biomodd prototype now at NYSCI

Screen shot of Biomodd virtual world

NYSCI is revving up for the next exhibit ReGeneration, with artist Angelo Vermeulen and team building the first part of the window garden for his Biomodd project, right now in NYSCI’s Central Pavilion. 

This week, the virtual world that will run on the Biomodd computer network is being developed (above image), and students at Parsons are creating concepts and prototypes for “caretaking robots” as part of the Biomodd Collaboration Studio.

If you want to learn more about Angelo’s project and his work, and you happen to be in the Los Angeles area, he is giving a lecture and demonstration at UCLA tomorrow.

In the meantime, mark your calendars for the long awaited opening of ReGeneration on October 27, 2012, at NYSCI.

A mere glimpse at day one of World Maker Faire 2012.

Photos: Andrew Kelly

Today’s Design Lab is on Energy. Where do you notice energy is being transferred? Here’s some tips to get ideas to harness energy in the world to power your own design projects. What can you design that uses the energy in mechanisms from your everyday life?

Music By JewelBeat
http://www.jewelbeat.com

It is official! Modular//Neuroid and The New York Hall of Science will be collaborating to create a multi-layered experience for middle and high school students in a project titled Collect, Construct, Change().  The project will give students the chance to collect data on environmental pollution in the field, and then offer them a platform in which to experience this data.  This experience will come in the form of an augmented reality cell phone application. The project will culminate in the form of several workshops over the summer at NySci, and a presentation and workshop at the first ever Maker Faire NYC (which is being held at the New York Hall of Science, September 25 and 26, 2010)! The final step of the project is to promote environmental advocacy through the children participating.  This is extremely exciting.  It also means that I am employed through October 2010. Thank goodness.

This has been on the books for some time now, and have waited to announce it on this site as there were several details to work out. Everything is a go, and I have already begun prototyping for this iteration of modular//neuroid.  I am extremely lucky to have this opportunity and intend on making use of it.  My involvement is the result of a collaboration between the New Youth City Learning Network, along with Parsons and NySci.  The team also consists of a Columbia post-doc, as well as the Bank Street College andCity Lore.

More on this soon!

In this experiment we turn the Blue Goo from liquid to a solid. But here’s the catch: it happens on it’s own via self assembly. Watch to learn more!

Sanitation Truck Test: Design I/O’s pre Puppet Parade prototyping

design-ionysci:

A test using a kinect to identify a sanitation truck being placed against the wall. The rubbish is then collected by the truck, disappearing from the projection. 

jtotheizzoe:

Continuing “Joe’s Answer Bag Week”:

What sciency apps would you recommend for the science-interested iPhone owner?
From: sandraisacaptain

Congratulations on your promotion to Captain, Sandra. Let’s cue some Android user rage in 3 … 2 … 1 …
Most days, I use my iPhone and iPad almost as much as my computer. I’ve gulped down a big glass of Apple flavored Kool-Aid, and I love it.
There’s a plethora of science apps available for iOS devices, and I’m sure I won’t cover them all. But here’s a few of my favorites (keep your eye on the notes down below as I’m sure lots of people will chime in with their favorites, too):
Space/Astronomy:
NASA has a great free educational app where you can track spacecraft and learn about projects.
For skywatching, I never look up without my iPad and GoSkyWatch, which is inexplicably free for the iPad only version (and a very underpriced $3.99 for iPhone/iPad compatible version). Seriously, it will change your life. Point it at something, it tells you what it is. It even draws constellations and has a red low-light mode.
Biology/Chemistry:
Molecules lets you input any Protein Data Bank or PubChem molecule identifier and then renders a 3-D version that you can rotate, zoom and space-fill. Must-have for molecular noodling on the fly.
Biophilia may cost $12.99, but it’s the best music+science combo project ever made, plus Björk! Total bio-porn.
Again, The Elements is pretty pricey for an app at $13.99, but it’s bar none the best app for exploring the periodic table.
The HHMI Click and Learn app has good biology modules from Howard Hughes, so you know it’s trusted. The HHMI Bulletin is a great science magazine too (free!).
In The Lab:
There’s actually useful apps to get stuff done in lab! Life Technologies has a useful app called DailyCalcs that will calculate solution concentrations, convert units, figure out dilutions and give you cell culture plating tips. Nothing you couldn’t look up or figure out on a paper towel, but nice to have it handy for free.
If you’re like me and you have to keep track of a lot of PDFs and research papers, I’m still torn on whether Mendeley or Papers is better. I use both, and I like both. One is free, of course.
I use the iPhone onboard timer a lot. Simple, but useful.
Math/Misc.
WolframAlpha: There’s Wolfram reference support built into Siri, but the full app is like a math search engine/calculator/reference guide all in one. Very cool.
Skeptical Science will help you refute climate deniers right from your pocket!
What else you guys got? Notice I did not add Angry Birds Space to the list, although I gladly would in exchange for a free download, because every man has a price.

jtotheizzoe:

Continuing “Joe’s Answer Bag Week”:

What sciency apps would you recommend for the science-interested iPhone owner?

From: sandraisacaptain

Congratulations on your promotion to Captain, Sandra. Let’s cue some Android user rage in 3 … 2 … 1 …

Most days, I use my iPhone and iPad almost as much as my computer. I’ve gulped down a big glass of Apple flavored Kool-Aid, and I love it.

There’s a plethora of science apps available for iOS devices, and I’m sure I won’t cover them all. But here’s a few of my favorites (keep your eye on the notes down below as I’m sure lots of people will chime in with their favorites, too):

Space/Astronomy:

  • NASA has a great free educational app where you can track spacecraft and learn about projects.
  • For skywatching, I never look up without my iPad and GoSkyWatch, which is inexplicably free for the iPad only version (and a very underpriced $3.99 for iPhone/iPad compatible version). Seriously, it will change your life. Point it at something, it tells you what it is. It even draws constellations and has a red low-light mode.

Biology/Chemistry:

  • Molecules lets you input any Protein Data Bank or PubChem molecule identifier and then renders a 3-D version that you can rotate, zoom and space-fill. Must-have for molecular noodling on the fly.
  • Biophilia may cost $12.99, but it’s the best music+science combo project ever made, plus Björk! Total bio-porn.
  • Again, The Elements is pretty pricey for an app at $13.99, but it’s bar none the best app for exploring the periodic table.
  • The HHMI Click and Learn app has good biology modules from Howard Hughes, so you know it’s trusted. The HHMI Bulletin is a great science magazine too (free!).

In The Lab:

  • There’s actually useful apps to get stuff done in lab! Life Technologies has a useful app called DailyCalcs that will calculate solution concentrations, convert units, figure out dilutions and give you cell culture plating tips. Nothing you couldn’t look up or figure out on a paper towel, but nice to have it handy for free.
  • If you’re like me and you have to keep track of a lot of PDFs and research papers, I’m still torn on whether Mendeley or Papers is better. I use both, and I like both. One is free, of course.
  • I use the iPhone onboard timer a lot. Simple, but useful.

Math/Misc.

  • WolframAlpha: There’s Wolfram reference support built into Siri, but the full app is like a math search engine/calculator/reference guide all in one. Very cool.
  • Skeptical Science will help you refute climate deniers right from your pocket!

What else you guys got? Notice I did not add Angry Birds Space to the list, although I gladly would in exchange for a free download, because every man has a price.

Tags: science apps tech

theworks-nysci:

We have been working intensively with Gigantic Mechanic, a NYC based game design firm to create a social game for our Great Hall exhibition on the theme of sustainability. We have spent a lot of time with dice and cards (my response was to make a game where you build a house out of the cards…

DesignLab 03: May 18, 2011 on Flickr.Teachers & NYSCI staff  returned for the 4th Design Lab Teacher Design Fellowship session on May 18, 2011. 
How to make connections to curriculum goals and different STEM disciplines were discussed, followed by a brainstorm/hands-on prototyping session on Where Do We Use Air to Do Work? and Putting Air To Work (Assistive Technology).

DesignLab 03: May 18, 2011 on Flickr.

Teachers & NYSCI staff returned for the 4th Design Lab Teacher Design Fellowship session on May 18, 2011.
How to make connections to curriculum goals and different STEM disciplines were discussed, followed by a brainstorm/hands-on prototyping session on Where Do We Use Air to Do Work? and Putting Air To Work (Assistive Technology).